What to Wear on Safari in Uganda
Sep03

What to Wear on Safari in Uganda

You’ve booked your adventurous safari and trekking holiday to the verdant emerald Pearl of Africa, Uganda. And now it’s time figure out what to wear on safari in Uganda. At Sun Safaris we’re certainly don’t proclaim to be fashionistas, or experts in outdoor gear, but our team has been on safari in Uganda and knows a thing or two about the appropriate attire. What to wear on safari in Uganda is entirely dependent on the region you visit, and your safari activity of choice. Your holiday wardrobe for Queen Elizabeth National Park is slightly different to the kit needed for gorilla trekking in the mind-blowing Bwindi. Just bear in mind that you are in tropical Africa, and in a country with contrasting scenes and climates. Be prepared. * Please avoid packing camo gear, it’s seen as military issue attire and shows little respect for the locals. Be subtle with your dress sense – and sensible. What to Wear on Safari in National Parks The national parks in Uganda suffer from extremes in temperature, so you’ll need to check the average temperature of the season and pack accordingly. Most of the time you are in sitting in an open game viewer, or on a boat cruise in the evening. the safari in National Parks is more sedentary so you won’t need those tough-as-nails hiking boots. Pack neutral colour, comfortable clothes. Nothing tight. Your lodge will probably have a swimming pool, so pack the bathing suits, shorts and flip flops for around the lodge. Sunblock, wide-brimmed hats, caps and sunglasses Pack comfortable walking shoes – active wear shoes in greens/olives/neutral. You won’t be running, hiking, but might be encouraged to enjoy a quick stroll. Scarf, beanie and jacket for cold weather and chilly mornings. Light fleece long tops, shirts and water resistant windbreakers Lightweight trousers are better than shorts. They protect against mosquitoes and annoying bugs. Avoid too much navy blue – it actually attracts mosquitoes and Tsetse flies. Red is too garish for wildlife – leave that at home! Ensure you invest in a technical, long sleeve safari shirt that has an anti insect repellent. Clothes become incredibly sticky and sweaty, so make sure you have plenty of climacool and cotton gear. The National Parks can be hot, sticky, muggy and sometimes uncomfortable. Pack wisely. What to Wear Trekking in Jungle Regions First off, the jungle regions are a LOT cooler than the safari regions – pleasantly so. For example, the Bwindi is located in a valley and carpets the slopes of the dormant volcanoes. Expect mist covered, moist mornings with a bite in the air. during the day it...

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Primates to Look-Out for While Gorilla Trekking in Africa
Jul11

Primates to Look-Out for While Gorilla Trekking in Africa

Gangs of chimpanzee eagerly swing from the branches that form a canopy over the lush Kibale National Park, while mountain gorillas knuckle-walk their way through the velvet greens of the jungles in Uganda, Rwanda and Congo. Both Uganda and Rwanda are sought-after gorilla trekking destinations and – along with Congo – are the only countries where mountain gorillas live freely in the wild. Rwanda and Uganda are premier destinations for gorilla trekking in Africa, but it’s certainly not the only reason why these recently-on-the-map destinations deserve mention ! If you’re drawn to the tropical rainforests of Uganda and Rwanda for its plethora of primates, we urge you to look further than just chimpanzee and gorillas. There are other unique species, even bush babies and that fall into the primate family alongside the monkeys listed below.   The most commonly spotted monkeys are the elegant long-haired black and white colobus monkeys (they look a bit like a rock star). A striking primate found in abundance throughout the forested regions and riparian woodlands of both Uganda and Rwanda. Unlike other primates, these monkeys actually lack thumbs which is where their namesake is derived. “Colobus” is loosely translated to mean “mutilated” in Greek. This particular species of old-world colobus is easily identifiable by its monochromatic colourations and white-tuft tail. While we’re on the topic of colobus monkeys, there’s also the Ugandan red colobus species. A primate with a rust colour cap and black face, the red colobus is known for its jumping and launching capabilities. Their long tails act as a rudder for balance which allows them to move at speeds through the gnarled jungle terrain. Like most monkeys, the colobus forms a vital part of the jungle’s eco-system.  They actually digest plenty of coarse toxic vegetation and naturally disperse seeds across the jungle floor. Most species of colobus monkey provides an easy source of prey for predators, raptors and even chimpanzee. When you’re traipsing through the rainforests, be sure to spot the territorial colobus monkeys – they make for excellent photographic subjects. The endangered golden monkey is a rare species of primate and is also only found in 3 countries (Rwanda, Congo and Uganda). This monkey should definitely on a wildlife enthusiast’s bucket list of primates to spot in Africa. A golden monkey has a face that appears to be covered in tightly woven wool-like fluff, and a body laden with grizzly golden fur that gleams in the light. Their contrasting black limbs and crowns on their heads, give the golden monkey a staggeringly beautiful appearance. Golden monkeys are hard to photograph because they’re so rarely seen and only naturally occur...

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