Expect the Extraordinary: 11 Night Safari by Private Jet
Dec06

Expect the Extraordinary: 11 Night Safari by Private Jet

Journey through Africa by private jet, and embark on one extraordinary adventure. Ignite Your Inspiration Changing the game of luxury travel, this 12-day journey masterpiece is centred on flexibility, originality, and paramount exclusivity. A unique expedition designed for intimate groups, offering unprecedented comfort and customisation to an unsurpassable safari experience. In September 2019, a limited two departures will signify the beginning of historic travel exploits through the continent’s most revered countries. Between 4 and 12 guests take to the skies, destined for the Masai Mara, Ngorongoro Crater, Victoria Falls, the Kruger National Park, and Cape Town. Let your mind wander, as you contemplate the possibilities of this aerial voyage across the land home to some of the world’s most archetypal species, natural monuments, human history, and natural finery. See the full itinerary, meet your private guides, and discover the state of the art jets you’ll travel in, here.  At a Glance September 2019 4-12 Guests 11 Nights/12 days of supreme travel in South Africa, Zimbabwe, Kenya and Tanzania Flexible itinerary which can extend to include Mozambique, Botswana, Namibia, Rwanda or Uganda Exclusive experiences and complimentary extras Your Exquisite Travel Experiences Choose one of two itineraries combining the carefully selected and seamlessly luxurious properties to customise your travel plans. Choose to travel from the South of Africa to the East, or vice versa, to determine which experience you’ll indulge in first, and which you save for last. Itinerary #1: Cape Town – Kruger National Park – Victoria Falls – Ngorongoro Crater – Masai Mara – Nairobi  Itinerary #2: Nairobi – Masai Mara – Ngorongoro Crater – Victoria Falls – Kruger National Park – Cape Town  From Cape Town to Kenya, or Kenya to the Cape; your choose the direction of your journey. Where You’ll Stay on this Prestigious Journey 2 x Nights at One&Only Cape Town, South Africa Cape Town’s illustrious shores are strewn with world class eateries, cosy beaches with white surf on turquoise waters, internationally recognised mountains hosting unique biodiversity, adventure trails, and scenic views in a metropolitan bowl of culture and style. One&Only is the City’s greatest offering for pampered accommodation, seamless service, and a faultless reputation for luxury, located right in the historic palm of the V&A Waterfront. 3 x Nights at &Beyond Ngala Tented Camp, Kruger National Park, South Africa The esteemed Ngala Private Game Reserve shares unfenced borders with the Kruger National Park, providing an exclusive take on this famed South African wildlife experience. With access to the reserve limited to guests at Ngala guests, the safari experience is pristine, uninterrupted, personalised, and immaculately carried out. An experience of a lifetime awaits at this...

Read More
Guest Photos from a Greater Kruger Safari Experience
Oct20

Guest Photos from a Greater Kruger Safari Experience

Over the years, we have got to know some interesting, passionate, and wonderful people who have contacted us to arrange the adventures of a lifetime. Some guests have come to know our consultants, and return time after time to sew together some of the most fantastic safari itineraries. Kim Richardson and Geraint Isitt are a couple who have consistently travelled with us, and most recently they returned from a Greater Kruger Park, where they visited three private reserves: Klaserie, Timbavati, and Sabi Sand. Following their safari, they shared their images with us, which we have included here to illustrate what an all-rounded, wildlife-rich experience this part of South Africa offers. Thank you, Kim and Geraint, for sharing your photos and feedback with us! Lodges visited: nThambo Tree Camp, Klaserie Private Nature Reserve Shindzela Tented Safari Camp, Timbavati Private Nature Reserve Notten’s Bush Camp, Sabi Sand Wildtuin The Sabi Sand showing off for Kim and Geraint on their recent trip to the Greater Kruger during a safari arranged by our agent, Natasha. This was only one of many phenomenal big cat sightings, and among numerous leopard encounters. Those icy blue eyes make this tom quite an unforgettable cat! The incredible 180° jaw stretch reminding us why we keep our distance from these enormous river mammals! Kim and Geraint captured some brilliant shots during their time in the Greater Kruger, and were ready at the right time when this hippo put on its territorial display in the middle of his dam. This big “yawn” is the perfect way to let other male hippos know to keep their distance. Battle wounds of a warrior, perfectly captured by Kim while on safari with us at Notten’s Bush Camp. This Sabi Sand king is one of the Charleston males – a powerful coalition of lions dominant in the area – and he is as strong as ever even after a couple of years donning this dislodged canine! All part of an incredible safari in the Greater Kruger. These humbling giants emerge ever so quietly from the bush, ambling silently towards us, making far less noise than would be expected from an animal of this size. Elephants possess the incredible ability to step elegantly over obstacles and remain quiet as a mouse, while they have the equal power to wreak havoc when the need arises. Trees are entirely uprooted and bark is stripped from ancient trunks with ease. These powerful members of the wild are extremely clever, emotional, and feeling animals, and it is a privilege to share their space with them. Thanks once again to Kim for sharing this beautiful capture taken while on safari with us...

Read More
Stories from the Masai Mara: Lion Pride Kills Wildebeest
Oct19

Stories from the Masai Mara: Lion Pride Kills Wildebeest

Another day, another Mara tale from our repeat guest, Nik Simpson! During August and September, the famous wildebeest migration is taking place in northern Serengeti, making those dangerous river crossings at the Mara and Talek Rivers in order to follow their age-old migration routes in pursuit of good grasses. Of course, the lions (and leopards, cheetahs, crocs, and hyenas) have learned over many years that this is where they stand a chance of an easy meal, and sure enough, plenty of wildebeest, zebra, gazelle, and other migrating antelope fall victim to the predating jaws of the hunters. Nik spent this year’s safari in the thick of it all in Kenya and Tanzania, and it paid off with plenty of breathtaking wildlife encounters associated with the magnetic migration. In recent blog posts, we’ve shared Nik’s photos and accompanying stories from a Talek River crossing, to a cheetah kill, a leopard and her cub, and now a superb safari experience while staying at Ilkeliani Camp: Lions taking down a wildebeest.  To see a kill in action is an occasion you’ll never forget. It takes your breath away and wreaks havoc with your emotions – the lions need to eat, but you want to wildebeest to survive. The circle of life is not always an easy pill to swallow. Something that is important to remember is that lion cubs only have a 50% chance of survival in the wild, and male lions in particular face plenty of difficulties from birth all the way until death. In addition, the wild lion population of the world has decreased from hundreds of thousands to only about 20 000, so to see a pride of lions thriving in their natural habitat is becoming more of a rarity every year. This astonishing moment in the Masai Mara went from thrilling to phenomenal when two lionesses successfully hunted a wildebeest, and then called their cubs out to join in the feast. With no male lions in the area, this little pride was free to eat in peace. Nik’s great images show about 6 cubs bounding over to their mother/s (it is likely that both females gave birth at a similar time given the size of the cubs and the litter), and after an enthusiastic greeting, the little ones tucked into the wildebeest kill alongside the lionesses, and Nik got to enjoy yet another magnificent moment on safari in East Africa....

Read More
Stories from the Masai Mara: Fig the Leopard and her Cub
Oct17

Stories from the Masai Mara: Fig the Leopard and her Cub

Our recent guest, Nik Simpson, embarked on an all-encompassing East Africa safari last month, and has since shared so much of his phenomenal photographs and stories on his personal Flickr account, inviting us to feast our eyes on some of the amazing wildlife sightings he enjoyed. On this particular occasion, Nik was at Porini Lion Camp in the Mara Olare Motorogi Conservancy just outside the Masai Mara National Reserve, and it is clearly right where the magic happens! On a safari itinerary that took him from the Masai Mara to the Serengeti and Ngorongoro Crater, Nik’s sightings reflected the wealth of wildlife residing in this wild African paradise. We’ve shared a couple of his photos and stories over the last few weeks (take a look at this Talek river crossing during the wildebeest migration, and this impossibly amazing kill involving 5 cheetah brothers), and now we’re all about this precious sighting of Fig the Leopard and her Cub! This superb sighting went from good, to better, to best over the space of a few days, as Nik continued to encounter Fig the leopardess on his game drives at Porini Lion Camp. One day, she was spotted patrolling her territory on her own, the next it was revealed she had a little cub hiding out in the thicket, and finally Fig hunted a scrub hare and brought it to her cub. An outstanding sighting in anyone’s book. One morning, Fig was spotted out on her own, patrolling her turf, and just through the thicket she had emerged from, her little cub could be spied. Only just, the 4-month old ball of fur was visible between the leaves, well hidden by its mother, who knows the dangers that lurk in the famous predator paradise that is the Masai Mara. Here, the little cub would spend hours on its own until Fig came back after her morning rounds. The next day, Nik was out on game drive, and yet again, Fig and her cub were the stars of the show. The mother and cub were hanging out in the branches of a tree, and before long, Fig descended, leaving her cub at a safe height while she went out to pick up some dinner. After a short while, Fig turned up with the goods. She had caught a scrub hare, which Nik described as being ‘too slow’, and she was spotted on her way back to the tree where he and fellow guests were keeping watch over the cub. She stopped a short distance away and began calling her cub, encouraging it to come down and find her. At first there was no reaction, but...

Read More
Five Cheetah Brothers Kill a Wildebeest in Masai Mara
Sep26

Five Cheetah Brothers Kill a Wildebeest in Masai Mara

It is rare to see one cheetah, never mind five, but when our recent guest, Nik Simpson, travelled to the Masai Mara recently, he was that guy with the greatest safari stories! He bore witness to five cheetah brothers taking down an adult wildebeest/gnu, which is incredibly fortunate, especially when we consider that during this epic East Africa journey arranged by our consultant, Michelle, he also watched two big wildebeest crossings at the Talek River, saw 6 separate kills, including another cheetah kill, 2 leopard kills, and 2 lion kills. All this in a 10-night safari! We will feature some of Nik’s other fantastic sightings in future blogs, but for the mean time, enjoy these raw and magnificent captures of a 5-strong cheetah coalition in the Masai Mara thriving during the wildebeest migration… Nik’s itinerary included 3 nights at Ilkeliani Tented Camp, Masai Mara National Reserve; 3 nights at Porini Lion Camp, Olare Motorogi Conservancy; 4 nights at Ngorongoro Serena Lodge, Ngorongoro Crater; and 1 night at Eka Hotel, Nairobi. He is now planning next year’s trip to Botswana! Five facts about cheetahs: 1. Cheetahs are the world’s fastest land animals. They use their incredible speed to hunt, bursting into sprints reaching 110km/h! 2. Female cheetahs live solitary lives after breaking away from their birth families after adolescence, while male cheetahs in a family stick together and form a coalition after they leave their mother. The five cheetahs in this sighting are brothers, which is the norm. Females give birth to a litter of cubs and rear their young on their own until they have matured and are ready to leave their mother’s side (at about 2 years old). 3. It is difficult to tell if a cheetah is pregnant because they have the ability to keep their growing bellies hidden using a muscle that tucks their womb up underneath the rib cage, ensuring they can be fast and agile in order to hunt and eat right up until the last days of pregnancy, which is about 90 days. 4. In the early 1900s, cheetahs used to roam all over Africa, numbering an estimated 100 000 individuals. Today, cheetahs are the most endangered big cat in the world, with only an estimated 9 000 – 12 000 wild individuals alive today. 5. Cheetahs hunt during the day, which means they don’t compete with lions and leopards, which are nocturnal hunters. This cat uses speed and not strength to kill, so would not stand a chance if they were in competition with bigger predators. They thrive in open savannah where they can use their speed to land prey, which is why the...

Read More
Client Feedback : Safari in Timbavati’s Honeyguide Mantobeni
Sep05

Client Feedback : Safari in Timbavati’s Honeyguide Mantobeni

Liselle’s clients enjoyed a spectacular safari experience at Honeyguide Mantobeni in the acclaimed Timbavati Game Reserve which shares unfenced borders with neighbouring private reserves and the Kruger National Park. Here is their feedback :  Liselle, Thanks for your email, we had a SUPERB trip to South Africa, it all went off without a hitch and I must admit our 3 days in Honeyguide were amazing and a huge highlight!!! Would recommend it to anyone at all in a heartbeat. The staff, guides, tents, drives, food, all were absolutely fabulous and we were blown away by it all, especially the kids!! Thank you so much for helping me organise it and I have all your details saved in case we ever go back or if anyone I know needs help booking their trips. My husband is already talking about potentially doing the Serengeti in a couple of years I’m not sure if you cover safaris there?? But I’ll need to start saving first   Thanks again for everything, hugely appreicated,...

Read More
Mala Mala Top Choice for Educational Family Safari
Nov23

Mala Mala Top Choice for Educational Family Safari

Ideally located adjacent to the Kruger National Park and the pristine Sabi Sand Game Reserve, is Mala Mala Game Reserve. This uncrowded reserve is home to the big five and over 400 species of birds, making it a sought after game viewing destination. Being one of the oldest and largest private reserves in the area, Mala Mala has strict game viewing protocols and the utmost respect for the wildlife roaming free throughout the reserve. Mala Mala has earned its reputation as being an exclusive crème de la crème of game reserves in South Africa and is a top choice for an educational family safari. Janelle, one of our consultants, enjoyed a luxury safari to Mala Mala with her young family. Mala Mala Main Camp is child-freindly and welcomes eager youngsters to their lodge. Children under four aren’t allowed on game drives, but there are plenty of bush bumbles and other game activities in which to participate. Upon arrival, guests are introduced to their ranger, who is their go-to person for the duration of teir safari. He/she is your teacher, host and wildlife ranger. Just like the majority of safari lodges, there is a set itinerary with scheduled times for game drives and meals. This is to take advantage of the times that predators and other animals are the most activie. If adults want a break and time to themselves, there is always the babysitting service which is at a nominal fee. Of course, in true bushveld lifestyle and the spirit of Africa, things are flexible. Although there is a suggested schedule, nature may interfere and game drives might be longer, depart later and other unpredictable events may occur. After all, we are governed by the power of nature. MalaMala Main Camp accommodation is in natural chalets that look like an extension of the wild. Chalets are interlinked via a myriad of pathways, which are hugged by tall trees and lush vegetation. Resting on the banks of the Sand River means that MalaMala certainly isn’t short of exceptional sightings. The camp is open, which means is free to wander throughout.   Here’s Our Interview with Janelle: 1. Is there a kids program at MalaMala? Yes!! When we arrived the ranger introduced herself (Casey) and then whisked the kids to  go and get their Mala Mala back packs and choose a toy from their curio shop.  Inside the bag were lots of activities for the kids to do at the lodge, but especially on the game drive. 2. Are children allowed to go on game drives?  Yes they are allowed from age 4.  Such a treat! 3. Is there a babysitter service in-house?  We never...

Read More